ETD system

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Tesi etd-06152016-192409


Thesis type
Tesi di laurea magistrale LM6
Author
SESSO, GIANLUCA
email address
gianse91@gmail.com
URN
etd-06152016-192409
Title
Electrophysiological and micro-architectural features of sleep in children at high risk for depression
Struttura
RICERCA TRASLAZIONALE E DELLE NUOVE TECNOLOGIE IN MEDICINA E CHIRURGIA
Corso di studi
MEDICINA E CHIRURGIA
Commissione
relatore Prof. Faraguna, Ugo
Parole chiave
  • spindles
  • CAP
  • children
  • depression
  • sleep
Data inizio appello
19/07/2016;
Consultabilità
parziale
Data di rilascio
19/07/2019
Riassunto analitico
Major depressive disorder is very common worldwide and its clinical importance reveals<br>the need for a global attention focused at identifying early risk biomarkers of the disorder.<br>Among these, sleep alterations have recently emerged as potential markers of depression<br>and other psychiatric conditions. A large body of literature has documented that<br>familiarity is a major component of the susceptibility of MDD and depression is more<br>likely to occur among the offspring of depressed mothers. Intriguingly, sleep in children<br>at high risk for depression has only scarcely been evaluated and research on this topic is<br>still at an early stage. For these reasons, the present study was aimed at comparing<br>electrophysiological features and CAP micro-architecture of sleep between a group of<br>twenty children born to mothers with MDD and a group of eleven sex- and age-matched<br>controls. Our most relevant results were a reduction of low-frequency spindle activity and<br>related spatio-temporal characteristics and an altered distribution of CAP phase A<br>subtypes in high-risk children. Our hypothesis is that the existence of a predisposing<br>genetic programming for depression may trigger the development of a neuronal circuitry<br>with limited spindles generation and increased cerebral arousability; this would produce<br>functional anomalies in brain maturation, thus resulting in an altered cortical plasticity<br>that could in turn represent a pathogenic factor for major depression.
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