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Tesi etd-08262020-165317


Thesis type
Tesi di laurea magistrale LM6
Author
MARANTONIO, SARA
URN
etd-08262020-165317
Title
Chronobiology and nutrition: the Italian context during the Lockdown.
Struttura
RICERCA TRASLAZIONALE E DELLE NUOVE TECNOLOGIE IN MEDICINA E CHIRURGIA
Corso di studi
MEDICINA E CHIRURGIA
Supervisors
relatore Prof. Faraguna, Ugo
relatore Prof.ssa D'Ascanio, Paola
Parole chiave
  • Chrono-nutrition
  • chrono-biology
  • lockdown
Data inizio appello
14/09/2020;
Consultabilità
Secretata d'ufficio
Data di rilascio
14/09/2090
Riassunto analitico
Background: chrono-nutrition comes from the intersection between chronobiology and nutritional sciences, exploring the impact of the timing of eating events on health outcomes. The restrictive measures adopted during the lockdown to face the COVID-19 emergency gave the opportunity to study people’s adaptation to new daily rhythms, such as sleep-wake cycle and the timing of food intake, especially among those who changed their working schedules.

Objective:
The main goal is to describe the distribution of variables inherent to chrono-nutrition and at the same to explore the presence of possible associations between chronotype and meal timing. Moreover, it is also crucial to identify the predictive variables for chrono-nutrition habits, with a focus on sleep-wake rhythm and other sleep-related variables.

Method:
We recruited 1302 subjects (806 females; avg. age 39,16±14,96) who underwent an online survey during the last part of the lockdown (from April 29th to May 17th). The survey was divided into different domains exploring personal data and demographics, routine and lifestyle habits, purchase behaviour, chrono-nutrition and chronotype, sleep quality, resilience and trauma. Chrono-nutrition was assessed using an adapted Italian version of the Chrono-nutrition Profile – Questionnaire (CP-Q), while chronotype was evaluated through the reduced Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (rMEQ).

Results:
We confirmed that chronotype is a good predictor of both preferred and actual eating event times. Morning types tend to anticipate the first and last eating event time compared to evening types (p<0.001). We then considered the (mis-)alignment between the preferred and the actual timing of eating and sleep events, and it emerged that a sleep duration misalignment predicts also a misalignment in the eating window (p<0.001).

Conclusion: both feeding and sleep patterns reflect a person’s circadian rhythm and they can both be taken into account as indicators of shifting in the rhythm itself.
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